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Artificial Intelligence Selected for a Literary Award - By : Anouer Kebir,

Artificial Intelligence Selected for a Literary Award


Anouer Kebir
Anouer Kebir Author profile
Anouer Kebir is currently working toward the PhD degree in electrical engineering at ÉTS. His research interests include real-time optimization and control of solar energy and bioenergy.

Researchers at Future University Hakodate, in Japan, developed an artificial intelligence (AI) which was selected in a literary competition. Its novel, The day a computer wrote a novel (Konpyuta ga shosetsu wo kaku hi, in japanese), had passed the first round of selection without the jury recognizing the machine behind the work.

After this great victory in a Go tournament, even though the robot did not win the top prize at the Nikkei Hoshi Shinichi Literary Award, it had certainly left its mark. The competition has been open for a few years to non-human candidates (“artificial intelligence and other programs”), but this is the first year that the jury truly received works written by AIs; out of 1450 proposals, 11 were written by robots.

It should be emphasized that the level of human involvement in the preparation of this novel was relatively high, estimated to be up to 80%. Japanese researchers defined the storyline and characters, and they let the AI select phrases and words prepared by humans. The Artificial Intelligence therefore wrote about 20% of the story.

Following is an excerpt of the novel: “I was overwhelmed with joy, a joy that I felt for the first time, and I wrote in a state of frenzy. The day a computer wrote a novel. The computer decided to concentrate on the pursuit of this joyful spirit, and altogether stopped working for the humans.”

Satoshi Hase, a Japanese science fiction novelist who was part of the press conference surrounding the award, commented: “This is surprising! The novel is well structured, with no mistakes, a good flow. There are however some problems, such as the description of each character.”

However, there is very limited information on the AI and on how it was programmed to achieve this. There is no scientific paper explaining the time it took to write the text, the type of computer learning that was used, whether the text was corrected by human reviewers or not, etc.

Hitoshi Matsubara, the project director, told the Japanese press that he was working on a method to allow the AI to create the plot of a story in order to reduce the proportion of human intervention. “Until now, artificial intelligence programs have often been used to solve problems that had existing answers, such as Go and Shōgi. In the future, I would like to extend the potential of AI so that it is closer to a form of human creativity”, he says.

 

 

Anouer Kebir

Author's profile

Anouer Kebir is currently working toward the PhD degree in electrical engineering at ÉTS. His research interests include real-time optimization and control of solar energy and bioenergy.

Program : Electrical Engineering 

Research laboratories : GREPCI – Power Electronics and Industrial Control Research Group 

Author profile

Field(s) of expertise :

Artificial Intelligence 

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